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Global Citizenship Alliance

Salzburg Global Seminar Proudly Announces the Launch of the Global Citizenship Alliance.
Newly established organization to operate Salzburg Global Seminar's successful Global Citizenship Program.

After 12 years, 71 sessions, and more than 3000 participants from 80 colleges and universities in the United States, the Global Citizenship Program (GCP) is reorganizing to increase its scope and streamline its operations. The GCP's staff have formed an independent organization, the Global Citizenship Alliance, which is assuming operating responsibility for global citizenship education programs previously run under Salzburg Global's aegis. The Alliance will continue to offer sessions "in association with Salzburg Global Seminar," underscoring both organizations' commitment to innovative, highest quality programs.

For latest information, consult the new Global Citizenship Alliance website at www.GlobalCitizenshipAlliance.org


News & Updates

CATEGORY
Hedwig C. Rose, long-time GCP faculty, speaks at West Valley College
Hedwig C. Rose, long-time GCP faculty, speaks at West Valley College
Dulce María Gray 
Some students cried. Everyone in the audience was impacted by Dr. Hedwig C. Rose’s presentation.

On Thursday 20 February 2014, Dr. Rose spoke about her experiences as a child in Amsterdam during Nazi Germany’s invasion and occupation of The Netherlands. The Netherlands had hoped to remain neutral during World War II, but on 15 May 1940, one day after the bombing of Rotterdam, Dutch forces were forced to surrender. Up to then, Dr. Rose was a happy and curious six year old Jewish child who enjoyed the closeness and warmth of her parents and her older sister. She was very excited about attending school and hoped to study, like her sister, Latin, Greek, other languages, literature, music, and history. She delighted in her toys, friends, and neighbors–until the Nazis arrived. Then her father and her five uncles and their families were rounded up and taken away, never to be seen again. The last letter her family received from her father was from
Auschwitz concentration camp in German-occupied Poland. Of the 107,000 Jews deported to camps, only 5,000 survived. Seventy-five per cent of The Netherland’s Jewish population were killed during Nazi occupation. That is, of the 140,000 Jews who lived in The Netherlands before 1940, only 30,000 survived the war. That is the highest death toll of any western European country. Dr. Rose told her story, a story much like that of Anne Frank, one of the over one million Jewish children who died in the Holocaust–except that fortunately Dr. Rose survived. Dr. Rose, her mother and her sister went into hiding in a tiny secret compartment of the cellar of a store belonging to a family friend. The three of them huddled in silence, until at age eight, Dr. Rose awoke to find that her mother, lying next to her, had died during the night. Subsequently, the Nazis imposed arbeitseinsatz, the drafting of civilian men (between the ages of 18 and 45) who were then forced to labor in German factories. The family hiding Dr. Rose and her sister had a young son, and thus he too had to huddle in the cellar compartment. The Germans cut off all food and fuel shipments; food was taken out of The Netherlands or gathered into distribution centers and then rationed. Dr. Rose and the family subsisted on sugar beets and tulip bulbs. During the height of this hunger, the Dutch famine–”hongerwinter“–of 1944-1945, hundreds of thousands became malnourished; 18,000 people starved to death. Dr. Rose and her sister survived in that tiny space for three years until the country was liberated on 5 May 1945! In 1947, Dr. Rose and her sister arrived at the home of their aunt and uncle in Rochester, New York, where they finished growing up. She attended the University of Rochester and received a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University, a master’s degree from Smith College, and a doctoral degree from the University of Massachusetts. Throughout her professional career, Dr. Rose focused on teacher preparation, comparative schooling, the philosophy and sociology of education, and on the First Amendment rights of teachers and students. Today Dr. Rose is a well-known speaker, a frequent visiting scholar at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution (where she continues to research for her book on The Netherlands before and during World War II), a faculty member of the Global Citizenship Program at the Salzburg Global Seminar, the author of Freedom and Restraint in the Lives of American Teachers; she is working on a book titled Living the Life of Anne Frank: A Childhood in Hiding. Dr. Rose stressed that in telling her story she hopes to convey not just that the scars of the Holocaust are visible and present today, but also that history is alive and sadly recurrent; the world is still experiencing genocide. She hopes that her story will enlighten many and perhaps even prompt some to act against injustice.
Dulce María Gray was a participant of GCP 48. The post Dr. Hedwig C. Rose, Survivor and Scholar, Speaks at WVC was originally posted on West Valley College Global Citizenship Center's blog.
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Robert Cowan, GCP faculty advisor, published in The Chronicle of Higher Education
Robert Cowan, GCP faculty advisor, published in The Chronicle of Higher Education
GCP Team 
In March, Robert Cowan, associate professor of English at Kingsborough Community College of the City University of New York, published a piece in The Chronicle of Higher Education about the role of faculty and students in community colleges. "My students may work full time or take care of children or aging parents," Cowan writes. "It may take them time to exit remediation. But they are in community college to be in college, to be challenged by the same material and rigor that they will encounter when they enter the workplace or transfer to a four-year college. If they are to take community college seriously, then the teaching must be taken seriously by faculty." Read the full text: Unsentimental Education
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Kevin Mersol-Barg joins the GCP team as Program Intern for three months
Kevin Mersol-Barg joins the GCP team as Program Intern for three months
GCP Team 
Kevin graduated from the University of Michigan in May 2013 with a B.A. in Public Policy. Prior to graduating, he founded and helped lead a student movement that successfully lobbied the University of Michigan to extend in-state tuition to undocumented students. After graduation, Kevin worked at a think tank that conducts research on access to higher education and as the finance director for a successful political campaign. He is from Metro Detroit, Michigan, where he grew up with his three siblings and enjoys biking.

In his role as Program Intern, Kevin helps facilitate GCP sessions and conducts research for future ones. For sessions, he prepares printed materials for participants and handles audio/visual technology. Kevin enjoyed getting to know the participants from Miami Dade College during GCP 60 and is looking forward to GCP 61 in April. The GCP team is excited to have Kevin on board.
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Reinhold Wagnleitner: "The Very Idea of America is a European Invention"
Reinhold Wagnleitner: "The Very Idea of America is a European Invention"
Alex Jackson 
Reinhold Wagnleitner, long-term faculty member of the Salzburg Global Seminar's Global Citizenship Program delivers his lecture on “The United States of America and the World: Views From a Distance” to the participants of GCP 60 from Miami Dade College. “[Globalization] is a very, very complicated term and what we are doing is trying to find a way of untangling this web of meanings and of sometimes not very meaningful expressions,” he intones. I ask Wagnleitner, a lecturer in modern history at the University of Salzburg, for a short description of globalization, but for the seasoned professor this would be akin to asking a politician to simply solve the recession overnight. “We cannot talk for 30 hours,” he jokes. He tries to summate the key points that participants of the Global Citizenship Program should take away. “Globalization is a term that has been used predominately from the end of the Cold War in describing first of all an economic and financial shrinking of the world with loss of the Soviet zone of influence. The world seemed to become one market more or less, and the financial flows have become dramatically stronger. Globalization is also the movement of people: refugees, asylum seekers, immigrants, which are influenced by the wars, revolution, anti-revolution, so we have in a sense a global flow of people or at least many people try to get into this flow because they have to get out of horrible situations. Then we have cultural globalization where one could argue, pessimistically, that the whole world becomes a homogenous place but globalization has to be understood as both global and local, so ‘glocalization’ is coming in.” Wagnleitner, who has also taught at numerous college institutions across the United States, first gave presentations to the participants of the Global Citizenship Program, then International Study Program, a decade ago. He explained how his talk had developed organically alongside an idea he had for a presentation at the Diplomatic Academy in Vienna, focusing on converging and diverging views of the United States. Reflecting on a decade of preparing for this unique educational experience, Wagnleitner sees a significant shift in the attitudes of the participants. “The reaction of the students and faculty and administrators with whom we have been working has evolved from being a mostly defensive viewpoint, as if they were responsible for these growing negative views outside, into more understanding and the understanding of politics and elections and the influence of Presidents Bush and Obama. So I do think that the GCP participants in a sense reflect the changes of the US itself, of the mood in the country itself, and in the mood of others looking towards the United States. It is a very good reflection of that I think.” In a decade that is bookended by 9/11 and the death of Bin Laden, Americans of all ages have had to come to terms with the idea that the US is not this beacon and bastion of liberty that they hold so dear. War has shot a hole in the belief of American justice and increased access to media coverage, thanks to 24 hour news channels, mobiles and the internet has led to a proliferation of sources by which students have reassessed their position in the world. “The last ten years have definitely made more US Americans, and people of other countries, aware that they have to be more cooperative and we can’t do this just by war because, as we know, not that much has been achieved as was the plan. If the richest countries in the world are unable to solve their problems by war, maybe there needs to be a plan B.” Yet, Wagnleitner, the chair of the Society of Modern History, is careful not to make grand or blasé statements. In a decade that has seen a lot of negative reaction, he insists that learning from mistakes is equally important. “We may make mistakes but not everything that we are doing is wrong. “I do see these young US Americans who come to these programs here being able to go back and have a better understanding of the way things are done here and that there is not only one way to do things, and learn from that.” As a recipient of the Tolerance and Diversity Prize from the Embassy of the United States in Vienna, Wagnleitner has long since believed in the need to be considerate and empathetic of alternative views from other cultures. Weighing in on topical issues, Reinhold puts his philosophy to practice in discussing Ukraine. “What has to be seen in the West is Russian feelings of security. NATO has gone eastwards and the Soviet Union was promised that NATO would not go eastwards. So whilst not supporting Russian imperialism in Ukraine, from a Russian viewpoint, and that is the empathy one has to have for an opponent, the actions are understandable from their side.” More, Wagnleitner warns that discussions such as those at Salzburg need continue to provide fruitful outcomes because the media lacks total clarity on these big issues. “The biggest problem is not that they are bad or anything sinister like that, but it is that they are not informed. They are leaving out certain things, because they themselves do not know what is going on.” There have been different ways of channeling this communication throughout history. Wagnleitner points to music, religion and the adoption of the English language as a lingua franca. “The spread of English to become at least the second language of many people who have the privilege of being schooled is potentially a force for understanding. Some people see it as a force of imperialism, cultural imperialism, but I would rather speak two or three languages, and thereby get deeper insights into another culture, into another way of speaking, into another literature and into another media usage, into another way of running a government, than being bound to only my language. “Each language acquisition opens up a completely new world for the learner: how to do things, how to think.” This is the very ethos of the GCP at Salzburg: to foster a new approach to cultural acquisition and understanding in students and the institutions that they attend. It is important that the study of this trend should occur in Europe, in order to better understand the history of relationships between much of the developed world. “America was not just discovered, it was conquered and it was also invented by Europeans; the very idea of America is a European invention," says Wagnleitner.  “Globalization, which now people think is ‘Americanization’ – a term I only use in quotes because it doesn’t make much sense – was already begun by the Europeanization of the world, by European imperialism, by European colonialism,” he adds.      
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Salzburg Global 2014 Program now available online
Salzburg Global 2014 Program now available online
Oscar Tollast 
Salzburg Global’s 2014 Program will feature over 25 distinctive sessions and workshops inspired by three interdependent values: Imagination, Sustainability and Justice. The three values underpin Salzburg Global’s new program ‘clusters’ and aim to form the foundations for global citizenship. Under these ‘clusters’, a number of topics will be discussed. For example, participants will be asked how societies can renew their education, how to improve life chances for present and future generations, or examine how societies can reframe responsibilities. The 2014 Program brings together distinctive multi-year projects and partnerships with the common goal of promoting vision, courage and leadership to tackle the most complex challenges of a globalized society. The Salzburg Academies – covering Global Citizenship, Media and Global Change, and the Future of International Law – will continue to prepare outstanding young people with the skills to drive change. Salzburg Global Seminar remains determined in breaking down barriers separating people and ideas. It spans the world’s regions and challenges countries at all stage of development and institutions across all sectors to rethink their relationship and identify shared interests and goals. The program is available for download as PDF. 2014 Program Brochure
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Global Citizenship Program Staff on the Road
Global Citizenship Program Staff on the Road
David Goldman 
On October, 5, a one-day meeting was held in Athens, Greece on Educating for the Modern Global Economy. In cooperation with the Fulbright Foundation Greece and with support from the Greek Politics Specialist Group, roughly seventy-five people gathered to discuss the role of universities in preparing their graduates for the modern, global, knowledge-based economy. International experts such as Anna Glass, a Policy Analyst and Economist at the OECD, and Voldemar Tomusk, Director for Policy and Evaluation at the Open Society Foundation offered their views on recent trends in higher education from around Europe and around the world. Additionally, panelists from Greece representing a technology business enterprise and from the University of Athens discussed how these trends relate to the current Greek situation and 'moving beyond the crisis.' For more information, see the report. The event, organized under the auspices of Salzburg Global Seminar - Austria, provided an opportunity to highlight Salzburg Global's ongoing work in the area of higher education policy with a focus on increased access, relevance, success, and attainment. It also allowed us to connect with our Fellows in Greece, expand our network, and engage new partner institutions. Salzburg Global was particularly pleased to be working with the Fulbright Foundation Greece on this event. The relationship between the two organizations dates back nearly four decades, yet this was the first time that we jointly organized an event and the first time for Salzburg Global to come to Greece. From October 7-10, David was in Montreal, Canada for the first World Congress on Access to Post-Secondary Education where he served as a rapporteuer. The World Congress was organized by the European Access Network with support from the Lumina Foundation, Education Testing Services, and the Council for Opportunity in Education. Each of these organizations was involved in Salzburg Global’s recent series on Optimizing Talent: Closing Education and Social Mobility Gaps Worldwide. That series of sessions helped frame the agenda and spread the word about the World Congress. The event offered another great opportunity for Salzburg Global to spread the word about its programming in order to extend and deepen the impact while reconnecting with Fellows who share our passion for increasing educational access and success through smart policy decisions and advocacy work.
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New Book by GCP Faculty Member
New Book by GCP Faculty Member
David Goldman 
Throughout his career and life, Peter has been traveling the world, meeting people, observing cultures and reflecting on his experiences. In Postmonitions of a Peripatetic Professor, Peter recalls and retells stories about some of the memorable journeys he has taken and the interesting people he has met as he “comments on six decades of academic life in the U.S. and abroad, his work as researcher, editor and consultant, his excursions as a travel journalist, and some intimate portraits of those he met along the way.” The book can be purchased through Levellers Press. Peter and his wife Hedy Rose regularly serve on the Faculty of GCP sessions and other programs at Salzburg Global. Peter is the author of numerous books and articles including They and We, The Subject is Race, Strangers in Their Midst, Tempest-Tost, Guest Appearances, The Dispossessed and With Few Reservations.

Peter Rose is Sophia Smith Professor Emeritus and Senior Fellow of the Kahn Liberal Arts Institute at Smith College. He and his wife, Hedy, live in Northampton and Wellfleet, Massachusetts.
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NEW WEBSITE

For latest information, consult the new Global Citizenship Alliance website at www.GlobalCitizenshipAlliance.org.