GCP » Overview

Global Citizenship Alliance

Salzburg Global Seminar Proudly Announces the Launch of the Global Citizenship Alliance.
Newly established organization to operate Salzburg Global Seminar's successful Global Citizenship Program.

After 12 years, 71 sessions, and more than 3000 participants from 80 colleges and universities in the United States, the Global Citizenship Program (GCP) is reorganizing to increase its scope and streamline its operations. The GCP's staff have formed an independent organization, the Global Citizenship Alliance, which is assuming operating responsibility for global citizenship education programs previously run under Salzburg Global's aegis. The Alliance will continue to offer sessions "in association with Salzburg Global Seminar," underscoring both organizations' commitment to innovative, highest quality programs.

For latest information, consult the new Global Citizenship Alliance website at www.GlobalCitizenshipAlliance.org


News & Updates

CATEGORY
GCP Faculty & Administrators Sessions
GCP Faculty & Administrators Sessions
GCP Team 
Approximately fifty-five participants from colleges and universities throughout the United States will gather to explore the factors that either support or restrain a comprehensive approach to global education within higher education institutions and to jointly develop strategies for those teaching and learning within those institutions on how they can incorporate a more comprehensive approach to global education. The session will include several formats including plenary lectures and discussions, small group discussions, and time for informal exchange and networking as outlined below. Plenary Lectures and Discussions Lectures will be delivered by an international Session Faculty who will speak about both the broad issues of globalization (such as sustainable development, global security issues, the image and role of the US, etc.) as well as specific perspectives, strategies and examples of global citizenship education at colleges and universities. Drawing upon case studies and experiences from both the US and abroad, the lectures will illustrate trends in education for global citizenship and the need for such education. The combination of looking at the “big issues” of globalization and some of the practical strategies and ways that these issues are affecting and addressed in US higher education will allow participating institutions and individuals to reflect upon and discuss how their institutional and individual work does, can, or should fit into this context. Some lectures will be followed immediately by a Plenary Discussion period in which participants are encouraged to ask specific questions that relate to their own interests, experience and work. The Plenary Discussion for some of the lectures will be held a few days after the initial lecture. This will allow participants to discuss the information presented in the lectures in formal settings such as the Thematic Group Meetings and Institutional Meetings as well as informally. Thus the Plenary Discussions in these cases can be more focused on the topics that are of particular interest and relevance to session participants. Thematic Group Meetings Several times throughout the session, participants, faculty, and staff will have the opportunity to engage in smaller Thematic Group Meetings focused on Thematic Conversations and Thematic Strategies. These two aspects will allow participants to explore some of the “big issues” of globalization in more depth in terms of how they relate to education for global citizenship in a broad sense (Conversations) and encourage them to develop practical ideas for addressing those issues in institutions of higher education (Strategies). The groups will be self-selected in Salzburg around themes that relate  to global citizenship education. Themes may include, for example, global commons and sustainable futures, the US as a global player, the importance of global civics, higher education at the juncture of the local and global, or others. Participants are encouraged think about themes that they are interested in discussing in Salzburg.  More detailed information on the Thematic Group Meetings will be provided at the beginning of the session in Salzburg. Institutional Meetings The Seminar recognizes that many of the participants attending this program are coming from institutions that have sent students and/or faculty to the GCP in the past. It is assumed that participants are aware of the initiatives and endeavors of past GCP participants at their institutions. The Seminar also recognizes that even though participants might be working at the same institution, they may not always have the chance to interact with their colleagues in the way that a week at the Salzburg Global Seminar affords them. Therefore, on several occasions throughout the week, time has been allotted for institutional meetings. Participants are encouraged to set their own institutional agenda for the week and to use this time in whatever way they feel is most useful and effective for their institution. In the past, participants have been encouraged to develop institutional initiatives or projects and action plans for how to implement them on their campuses. Some institutional groups may want to engage in this type of exercise. For others it may be more useful to discuss and plan ways in which they can further contribute to and enhance the institutional initiatives focusing on education for global citizenship that are already underway. And still others who may have specific expectations or assignments from their institutions can use this time to address those. Networking Opportunities Because networking opportunities are an important part of any conference, participants will have plenty of chances to informally share ideas and experiences as they develop personal and professional relationships that will hopefully continue beyond the duration of the session. If there are issues that are not explicitly addressed in the session schedule which participants would like to have a chance to discuss with colleagues, time to do so can be arranged formally or informally at reserved tables over meals or during the “flex time” that is listed on the schedule. UPCOMING DATES GCP 64 (Jul 6 – 13, 2014)
Education for Global Citizenship: What, Why, and How?
GCP 65 (Jul 13 – 20, 2014)
Education for Global Citizenship: What, Why, and How?
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Global Citizenship Program 60 | Pathways to Global Citizenship: Roots and Routes
Global Citizenship Program 60 | Pathways to Global Citizenship: Roots and Routes
GCP Team 
The Global Citizenship Program is a program offered by the Salzburg Global Seminar that provides and promotes global citizenship education in cooperation with a variety of individual and institutional partners. Global citizens are people who have developed the knowledge, skills, tools, values, and commitment to:
  • Understand the nature of globalization, including its positive and negative impacts around the world, and realize how it is transforming human society
  • Appreciate the diversity of humanity in all of its manifestations, from local to global, and interact with different groups of people to address common concerns
  • Recognize the critical global challenges that are compromising humanity’s future and see how their complexity and interconnections make solutions increasingly difficult
  • Collaborate with different sets of stakeholders, by thinking globally and acting locally, to resolve these critical challenges and build a more equitably sustainable world
Broadly speaking, global citizens are consciously prepared to live and work in the complex interdependent society of the 21st century and contribute to improving the common global welfare of our planet and its inhabitants. Session Faculty Alex SEAGO is chair of the Department of Humanities, Social Sciences and Communications at Richmond University in London, England. With an interdisciplinary academic background in American studies, cultural history and cultural studies, Dr. Seago has taught for a wide variety of American and British universities and colleges, including the University of Kansas, The Royal College of Art, Sotheby's Institute, Bournemouth University, Poole College of Art and Design, and the London campuses of the University of Maryland, University of Wisconsin and Syracuse University. Dr. Seago's research interests focus upon the area of cultural globalization - with particular reference to music, art and design. He has published in a wide range of journals and an article of his on global popular music in the 21st century was awarded the Stone-Suderman Prize by the Mid-Western American Studies Association. His book, Burning the Box of Beautiful Things: The Development of a Postmodern Sensibility, examines the relationship between art and design education and the rise of contemporary pop culture in the United Kingdom during the 1950s and 1960s. Dr. Seago received a B.A from the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom, an M.A from the University of Kansas in Lawrence, and a Ph.D. from the Royal College of Art in London. He is an alumnus of the Salzburg Global Seminar. Dr. Seago's wife, Lubna, is joining him for the session. Tazalika M. TE REH is a scholarship recipient at the Urban Transformations Ph.D. Program, funded by the Mercator Foundation. She is part of the American Studies Department of the TU Dortmund, where she is working on her Ph.D. thesis on architecture, space and the racial. As a trained architect with research interests in architecture, African American studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies and architecture education, she earned degrees from the Universities of Applied Sciences in Cologne and Bochum and the Art Academy in Düsseldorf. The topic of her M.A. thesis was "Architecture from A to Z. Concept for an architectural TV show for kids." In 1997, she received a DAAD grant for a work stay in Boston/Cambridge, Massachusetts, at the architecture firm Moshe Safdie & Assoc. Her work experience incorporates architectural practice, the work as a curator and as the executive assistant to the board of the art foundation Stiftung DKM and its museum in Duisburg and teaching. Reinhold WAGNLEITNER is associate professor of modern history at the University of Salzburg and was visiting professor of United States history at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and the University of New Orleans, Louisiana. For many years he also played bass and sang in Austrian rock and jazz bands. He is a lecturer of history at Salzburg College and the former president of the Austrian Association for American Studies. In 1998, he founded the research group "History @ Internet." Until 2012 he was the chair of the scientific board of the Leopold-Kohr Academy and is the chair of the Society of Modern History. In 2001, Dr. Wagnleitner's project, "Satchmo Meets Amadeus" was awarded the Tolerance and Diversity Prize from the Embassy of the United States in Vienna. Dr. Wagnleitner is the author of Coca-Colonization and the Cold War: The Cultural Mission of the United States in Austria After the Second World War, the co-editor of Here, There, and Everywhere: The Foreign Politics of American Popular Culture. His most recent book is Satchmo Meets Amadeus. Dr. Wagnleitner serves on the Editorial Advisory Board of the Encyclopedia of New Orleans, which will be published to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the city in 2018. He is a Fellow and has served on the Faculty of many Salzburg Global Seminar sessions and is a Core Faculty member of the GCP, having participated in over fifty sessions for both students and faculty. Günter WAGNLEITNER has been a fixture of the Austrian music scene since the late 1960s. As early as the 1950s, he performed in Linz, Salzburg, and Vienna engaging a musical concept that connected classical music and jazz; church music and blues; light opera and Rock 'n´ Roll. Needless to say, that pioneering approach met with the total rejection of the gatekeepers of "High Culture." Günter's rejection from the hallowed halls of teachers´ colleges in Linz and Salzburg - the reason cited: seduction of youth with dangerous music - became legendary within the scene. Before he finally concluded his studies (piano and singing) at the Mozarteum and took a position as a music teacher at the Salzburg and Upper Austrian music schools, he undertook 25 years of touring with his own bands in several European countries. He worked as a pianist-singer-entertainer on numerous cruises on board German and Soviet luxury liners in the Mediterranean, in the North and Baltic Seas, the Black Sea, in the Atlantic Ocean and in the Caribbean. Recently he has toured Austria and Germany with his brother´s Informance "Jazz - the Classical Music of Globalization."
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Report on The Mellon Fellow Community Initiative now available online
Report on The Mellon Fellow Community Initiative now available online
Oscar Tollast 
A new report on The Mellon Fellow Community Initiative (MFCI) is now available to view online. Produced by Salzburg Global, the report is entitled, ‘Creating Sites of Global Citizenship’. The MFCI offers week-long seminars and shorter workshops for faculty and administrators to develop tailored approaches of incorporating global citizenship education into the fabric of their institutions. In the last five years, the MFCI has brought together more than 250 people from 36 colleges and universities with world-class international faculty. These students have been taken from either designated Historically Black Colleges and Universities or members of the Appalachian College Association. The report includes a number of essays on Global Citizenship Education, personal experiences and reflections from MFCI participants, and information on the next steps forward. In addition to this, Salzburg Global President and Chief Executive Officer, Stephen Salyer has penned a letter outlining the MFCI’s significance. In an extract taken from this letter, Mr Salyer writes: “As this report demonstrates, the MFCI’s unusual constellation of partners is uniquely suited to developing and implementing innovative approaches to global citizenship education in classrooms, across campuses, and throughout communities. “Through the MFCI, our partners have embarked on a journey to explore and reinterpret their own historical legacies for the 21st century.” The MFCI is based on Salzburg Global’s Global Citizenship Program, created in 2004, which has brought together nearly 3,000 higher education administrators, professors and students from 80 colleges and universities. Jochen Fried, Director of Education at Salzburg Global, and David Goldman, Associate Director of Education at Salzburg Global, have been involved in all stages of MFCI conceptualization, planning and implementation. The initiative remains committed to strengthening educational access, success and relevance. It holds a determination to find practical ways to advance global citizenship through rigorous teaching, research, cross-cultural exchange and community outreach.
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Justice Anthony Kennedy: “We are all trustees of freedom”
Justice Anthony Kennedy: “We are all trustees of freedom”
Salzburg Global Staff Writer 
US Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy took the floor at Salzburg Global Seminar on Monday, July 15 to make some remarks “On Citizenship” to an engaged audience of university and college faculty and administrators. Addressing participants from community colleges, small liberal arts colleges and large state universities, Justice Kennedy urged them to see themselves as the “trustees of freedom” and to encourage their students to also see themselves as such. The more than 50 college professors and administrators were taking part in the 59th session of the Global Citizenship Program, held last week at Schloss Leopoldskron. This session on ‘Education for Global Citizenship: What, Why, and How?’ focused on how colleges and universities can embed global citizenship education into the fabric of their institutions. Justice Kennedy has a long relationship with Salzburg Global Seminar and the Global Citizenship Program. He first came to a Salzburg Global session in 1988 – the same year as he was nominated to the US Supreme Court – as a member of the faculty for session 269 ‘American Law and Legal Institutions’. He has since served as faculty or a guest lecturer at two law-related sessions, as well as five sessions of the GCP and the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change. The session concluded on July 21 with participants having developed strategies to create, strengthen and implement programs designed to transform their institutions into ‘sites of global citizenship.’ The GCP is concluding its tenth year of programming and has fostered deep and sustainable change at over 80 colleges and universities.
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Salzburg Director of Education to advise ETF
Salzburg Director of Education to advise ETF
Salzburg Global Staff 
Jochen Fried, Salzburg Global Seminar's Director of Education, has been appointed to the advisory board of the European Training Foundation (ETF)'s FRAME project, which supports pre-accession countries to strengthen their human resource development.

ETF is a decentralized agency of the European Union based in Turin, Italy. Its mission is to help transition and developing countries to harness the potential of their human capital through the reform of education, training and labor market systems. The FRAME project aims to answer such questions as: "Which skills should we (in our country) develop towards 2020, and how can these skills be generated by the education and training system? What are the capacity needs of institutions to achieve the 2020 vision for skills? (This includes capacity review of policy planning, implementation and monitoring and the capacity to use foresight as forward looking policy making approach). What indicators are needed to monitor progress and targets for the 2020 vision of skills? How can countries create synergy in human resource development and learn from each other?"

"The countries seeking to accede to the European Union require a strategic approach to developing a vision for human resource development focusing in particular on the skills that are more likely to be needed in the period 2014-20," states the ETF website.

As member of the FRAME Advisory Board, Dr. Fried will attend the Torino Process Conference 2013: Moving Skills Forward on May 8-9.

The Torino Process  was launched in 2010, and is a biannual participatory analytical review of the status and progress of vocational education and training in the ETF partner countries, which include not only countries in the "Enlargement Region" such as the former Yugoslavian states and Turkey, but also the wider "European Neighbourhood" and Central Asia.

According to the ETF, "The objective of the Torino Process is twofold: to acquire up-to-date knowledge about the policies and their results in a country; and to strengthen the ownership, participation and evidence-bae of policy making to improve the performance of policies."

In his advisory role, Dr. Fried will be able to draw on his extensive experience and contacts accumulated during the Universities Project (1998-2003) and the Global Citizenship Program (2004-present) of Salzburg Global Seminar. The cooperation with ETF will help strengthen SGS’s relations to the EU and generate synergies across our programs.

The Torino Process Conference 2013: Moving Skills Forward starts today, May 8 at 2pm CEST and will run for two days in Turin, Italy. A guide to the conference can be found in the ETF's Issuu library and for those wishing to follow the conference live, ETF (@etfeuropa) and other participants will be tweeting on the hashtag #etftrp and posting on Storify.

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Salzburg Spirit Lives on in California
Salzburg Spirit Lives on in California
Salzburg Global Staff Writer 
An interactive session at the University of San Francisco with students examining human rights activism, a lecture on “Human Rights: Does People Power Work?” at San Jose State University, and a workshop at West Valley College exploring the role of global citizenship at community colleges in the 21st century. These are just some of the activities that Champa Patel, Head of Activism, Amnesty International UK, was involved in during a recent trip to California. Dr. Patel serves regularly as a faculty member at the Salzburg Global Seminar’s Global Citizenship Program sessions and from April 16 to 19 she took the show on the road to three GCP partners. The University of San Francisco, which has been involved in the GCP since 2005, invited Dr. Patel to participate in three events: a session for Professor Noah Borrero’s teacher preparation course at USF's College of Education, an all campus event on human rights activism and a special session for the students who will be attending an upcoming GCP session in Salzburg in May. Each of the events were tied to Dr. Patel’s human rights activism work at Amnesty International and to themes that she explores in-depth at Global Citizenship Programs.  Next was an interactive lecture on “Human Rights: Does People Power Work?” at San Jose State University, also a GCP partner since 2005. About 50 students and faculty, many of whom are a part of the SJSU Salzburg Program, attended Dr. Patel’s lecture followed by time for an informal reunion of GCP Fellows from years past.  The final stop was West Valley College for a one-day workshop on “The 21st Century Educational Institution: Global Citizenship, Civic Engagement, and Student Success.” This workshop is part of an ongoing initiative co-organized by West Valley College, San Jose State University, and the Salzburg Global Seminar to incorporate coherent global citizenship programs in secondary schools, community colleges and at the university level. A further “mini-Salzburg” conference will be held at Leigh High School, San Jose, California in collaboration with SJSU and West Valley College on Friday, May 10. The workshop at West Valley College addressed questions such as: How does high-mobility, intercultural connections, and globalization impact our students and our pedagogy? What is the role of global citizenship in community colleges? How can global education emphasize the civic significance of preparing students with knowledge and for action? Can global and civic engagement affect student success? Peter Rose, Sophia Smith Professor of Sociology and Anthropology Emeritus and Senior Fellow, Kahn Liberal Arts Institute at Smith College and another long-time GCP Faculty member, also spoke at the workshop. This series of events coordinated by three GCP partner institutions is an example of how the Global Citizenship Program seeks to positively impact the lives of the students, professors, and administrators who attend sessions in Salzburg and to lay the foundation for ongoing institutional engagement and change. “The Salzburg spirit is still very much alive here [in California],” added West Valley College Art History Professor, Cynthia Reiss, who attended the 48th session of the GCP: Colleges and Universities as Sites of Global Citizenship in 2011.
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New year, new name: ISP becomes the Global Citizenship Program
New year, new name: ISP becomes the Global Citizenship Program
Louise Hallman 
If all good things must come to an end, a quick glance at the 2013 Salzburg Global Seminar program listing would suggest that the well-renowned International Study Program (ISP) has disappeared. But fear not! The Seminar’s longest-running program has not vanished, but been renamed the Global Citizenship Program. Besides its new name, 2013 introduces a number of new facets to the Global Citizenship Program (GCP): the year will also see newly revised week-long programs launched and new partnerships being formed. What’s in a name? In essence, the International Study Program has always been a global citizenship program – indeed that principle has been at the very heart of the program since it was established in 2004 with its first two partners, Miami Dade College in Florida and Iowa State University. The need for the new name, explains Dr. Jochen Fried, Salzburg Global Seminar’s Director of Education, came from the growing recognition of the distinction between ‘international’ and ‘global.’ “Global and international are not the same,” says Fried, who has been leading the Seminar’s higher education programs since 1999.   “Global is the combination that is planetary and local at the same time – like climate change. Is climate change local? Of course it’s local – you experience it locally! But at the other end, it cannot be addressed on the local level alone. You can’t escape it by shrinking it to its local or national dimension. So it is global in reach. “That is different from the ‘era of international’ when governments were basically still able to protect the people within a nation state against unwanted external influences and disruptions. For example, in economics they used tariffs, customs or import quotas to deliver on their promise, which is to preserve and promote the well-being of their citizens. But in a globalized world, the power and capacity of the traditional political actors, including governments, to do so is eroding.” Many of the aspects that have made the ISP/GCP unique inevitably remain. Since its beginnings, the GCP has sought not only to inspire and enact change within individual participants and their peer groups at their home colleges or universities. Rather, the GCP has aspired to change the very higher education institutions from which the students, faculty and administrators come. “[The GCP] was not just for the few select people to have a pleasant week in Salzburg but actually to become change agents in their own right, on their own campuses, which in turn requires the institutions to take a strategic approach in sending participants to Salzburg,” explains Fried. “You can’t expect people to spend a week in Salzburg on an intense week-long program on global citizenship to come back and suddenly make everything change unless you empower them on their own campuses to do so.” For many participating colleges and universities, the selection of students to come to the four annual week-long programs at Schloss Leopoldskron is very competitive.  Of Miami Dade College, the largest higher education institution in the United States with around 170,000 students, only the best 50 students of its 800-strong honors program are chosen each year. The annual faculty and administrators program, hosted at Salzburg during the summer break is equally selective. Fried says that the GCP partner institutions have become very deliberate in appointing (and sponsoring) those who get to come to this program. “Our partners understand that real change is a long-term effort and requires the buy-in of all the stakeholders, particularly of all faculty and administrators. So it’s the combination that the GCP is offering which makes the difference – that students, faculty and administrators are not just being sent on a short-term study abroad trip or a faculty development exercise in a vacuum. We tell our partners from the start that, if they do it right, over time they will build critical mass on their campus that they can draw upon to plant global citizenship education into the DNA of their institutions.” Moving on The program now has some 2500 alumni from almost 80 partner institutions. Many of these students have gone on to pursue higher degrees or seek employment in the international and global arena (and many have returned to Salzburg for SGS’s own internship program); the movement into these areas of study and employment is something many admit they would never have considered had it not been for their time in Salzburg. The GCP staff in Salzburg, who include David Goldman, Associate Director of Education, Astrid Schroeder, GCP Program Director and Ginte Stankeviciute, the Salzburg Academies’ Program Associate, are trying to support students who want to actively move on from the program, identifying organizations into which graduates can place their global citizenship and social justice-seeking efforts, beyond the scope of those NGOs which are fairly obvious like Amnesty International, Greenpeace and UNICEF, etc. But it’s not just the students who have ‘graduated’ from the program. Of the 50 to 60 institutions currently active within the program, many, by virtue of the training of faculty and administrators through both sessions held in Salzburg and the on-site workshops offered at their campuses by the GCP team, have now fully embedded global citizenship into their programs and curricula. Some institutions have even gone so far as to win national awards for their own global citizenship programs. They are now ready to take their global citizenship education to the next level. As such, the GCP staff is constantly adjusting the program to partner institutions’ needs and specific requests. This year, for example, all student sessions will have a specific thematic focus – ‘Global Citizenship and Universal Human Rights,’ ‘Global Citizenship: Ethics and Engagement,’ and ‘Pathways to Global Citizenship: Roots and Routes’ – in addition to the long-running ‘Global Citizenship: At Home and in the World,’ designed with the multi-time returning partners in mind. Unlikely partners The partner institutions of the Global Citizenship Program have thus far been all US-based colleges and universities. But that is not to say that the students have been by any means the traditional image of an all-American student. “It has become a characteristic of the GCP that we bring together very unlikely partners, and these unlikely partnerships have in and of itself become an asset of the program,” says Fried. “The HCBUs [Historically Black Universities and Colleges] come together with the Appalachian colleges which serve a very different population; then you have the biggest US higher education institution [Miami Dade College, Florida]; as well as other large and small, urban and rural, community colleges mixing with the splendour and very wealthy liberal arts colleges, like the University of San Francisco. Everyone is coming together. “This diversity is a unique strength of the GCP and adds a crucial element to the impact that participants and partner institutions alike attest: when it comes to global citizenship, it doesn’t matter where you are coming from—we need to get the same mindset. If we remain stuck in our boxes, we are missing the most elementary lesson of what global citizenship ultimately is all about.” These unlikely partnerships are deliberate, encouraging students to confront, discuss and understand the national, linguistic, ethnic, religious, social and economic range and multiformity  alive in their own country of study, as well as the world at large.  Whilst the GCP grew out of the Salzburg Global Seminar’s Universities Project, it is from community colleges that many of the GCP’s participants come. Dubbed by some as the “Ellis Island of US higher education,” these two-year institutions are often more diverse and more globalized than any other segment in US academia.  "Take for example Kingsborough Community College,” says Fried. “23,000 [students] in Brooklyn, NY; like so many US institutions they have all the flags up of where they have students coming from. In the case of Kingsborough, there are 142 country flags. I doubt that except for the UN there are too many other institutions even in New York that are composed of a similar number of nationalities. “But we are not romanticizing this. There is the flip-side of globalization and there are clashes in this world. In a very real sense, community colleges of this type are pre-figuring the world as a global village, which will be our daily experience more and more in the future.” These sort of diverse institutions are a good fit for the GCP because, as Fried says, “They are already globalized, and they are all about providing opportunities for the less privileged.” Another new aspect of this year’s program is the active international expansion and invitation of non-American institutions to the program, starting with the July faculty and administrators session. From there, Fried hopes to expand and, in the near future, have students from these other countries participate alongside their American peers, similar to the three-week Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change. Building from the ground up As the Global Citizenship Program forges new ground in 2013 with its new name, new programs and new partners, its ethos will stay the same. In its recruitment and expansion, the GCP will continue to put an emphasis on the broadest possible crosscut of partner institutions. According to Fried, for many, globalization has the distinct flavour of corporate elites dividing up power and wealth among themselves. To a certain extent, especially in the United States, this is also reflected in whose children get access to the exclusive and expensive universities. “The GCP combines academic rigor and a spirit of democratic egalitarianism, as it befits a program promoting citizenship with a global perspective.   “That is kind of the pre-consideration that is critical for the idea of global citizenship writ large: all voices must be taken into account,” explains Fried. “Those who are in the margins experience the impact of globalization in a way that those who call the shots in globalization will never know. And when you experience globalization from below, you probably have more answers for how to address troubles in the global village...  “The constellation of our partner institutions reflects the spirit of what we mean by ‘global citizenship’ – it’s empowerment from below.”
The Global Citizenship Program will this year run on the following dates: February 28-March 7, March 24-31, May 19-25, May 25-June 1, with the faculty and administrators program on July 14-21 entitled ‘Education for Global Citizenship: What, Why and How’. To find out how your institution can be part of the program, please contact Astrid Schroeder, Global Citizenship Program Director:
aschroeder@salzburgglobal.org We do not accept applications directly from students. Interested students must apply through their home institutions. To find out if your college or university is a partner, please visit our website.
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NEW WEBSITE

For latest information, consult the new Global Citizenship Alliance website at www.GlobalCitizenshipAlliance.org.