GCP » Overview

Global Citizenship Alliance

Salzburg Global Seminar Proudly Announces the Launch of the Global Citizenship Alliance.
Newly established organization to operate Salzburg Global Seminar's successful Global Citizenship Program.

After 12 years, 71 sessions, and more than 3000 participants from 80 colleges and universities in the United States, the Global Citizenship Program (GCP) is reorganizing to increase its scope and streamline its operations. The GCP's staff have formed an independent organization, the Global Citizenship Alliance, which is assuming operating responsibility for global citizenship education programs previously run under Salzburg Global's aegis. The Alliance will continue to offer sessions "in association with Salzburg Global Seminar," underscoring both organizations' commitment to innovative, highest quality programs.

For latest information, consult the new Global Citizenship Alliance website at www.GlobalCitizenshipAlliance.org


News & Updates

CATEGORY
ISP 52 - Issue 3: King College junior Micah-Sage Bolden writes on his experiences as an ISP student
ISP 52 - Issue 3: King College junior Micah-Sage Bolden writes on his experiences as an ISP student
Micah-Sage Bolden 
SALZBURG – May 15-18, 2012 My experience with the Salzburg Global Seminar from over the last three days has broadened my emotional range, my international confidence, and my mastery of collaborative action; just as the seminar challenged me intellectually so did it emotionally and socially. One of the most touching experiences I have had was our trip to the Dachau Memorial. I had been reading about the Holocaust since I was young, but nothing could have prepared me for the heartbreaking weight of visiting a site that was host to the worst of what people of capable of, ‘singing with the voices of thousands of lost souls’. Each exhibit combined historical perspectives with an aura of sentiment unmatched by other memorials I have visited. Our excursion sparked passionate discussion upon our return that not only touched me intellectually, but also spiritually. The day following our Dachau tour we explored the histories and culture of pre- and post- Cold War Europe with Astrid Schröder, continued our intellectually enriching group work, and experienced a joint class with students from the University of Salzburg taught by Reinhold Wagnleitner, held at the university. My discussions with the Salzburg students helped to explore the intricacies of the problems facing America and addressed European views of the social, political, and economic struggles of the United States. Finally, Thursday’s presentation by Darci Arnold raised pertinent questions regarding the issues of corporate responsibility, the rising importance of data and integration between data, technology, and our lives, as well as the societal and cultural changes brought on by the advent of digital media and the digital economy. Our group work helped to solidify our views of global citizenship and its importance in our globalized society and aided in the development of lifelong partnerships in the pursuit of social justice and the maintenance of a global citizenship. My experiences with the seminar have expanded my mental and spiritual capacities and enhanced my understanding of international perceptions of the United States.
Micah-Sage Bolden is a junior at King College in Bristol, TN, USA. He is majoring in history, political science and philosophy, concentrating on intelligence and security studies. He is the communications officer of the King Security and Intelligence Studies Group (KSI) and a member of the King World Awareness and Activation Campaign. He has served as the executive editor of King College’s Security and Intelligence Studies Journal; editor-in-chief of the Kayseean, a bi-weekly student publication; a member of the Board of Directors of the Appalachian Peace Education Center; and co-author of “Social Networking as a Paradigm Shift in Tactical Intelligence Collection” in the 2012 Mediterranean Council for Intelligence Studies. In the future, Micah-Sage would like work in diplomacy and social activism. 
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American Students Join Together in Salzburg for the 52nd International Study Program
American Students Join Together in Salzburg for the 52nd International Study Program
Louise Hallman 
Since 2004, Salzburg Global Seminar has gathered American undergraduates from partner colleges for week-long International Study Programs (ISP) covering global citizenship. The ISP provides an intensive international experience for participants to explore issues of worldwide concern and to view them from a perspective both literally and figuratively outside the borders of the United States. Students develop the tools to be more discerning in their assessment of information pertaining to world affairs and to understand what it means to be a “global citizen”. ISP 52 students came from King College, TN, Ferrum College, VA, West Virginian Wesleyan College, WV and Bennett College for Women, NC, to participate in classes on Mapping Ethnocentrism and Globalization, From Every End of This Earth: The American People in the 20th and 21st Century, Women in Islam and in Africa: Perspectives from Sudan and Beyond, The US of America and the World: Views From a Distance, Corporations as Global Citizens, and The Digital Economy & Brand YOU! The week also involved intensive group work and presentations, as well as an excursion to the Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial Site in Dachau, Germany. King College student Micah-Sage Bolden shares his experience in a three-part series. You can find these related to this article below.
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ISP 52 - Issue 2: Global Citizenship: At Home and in the World
ISP 52 - Issue 2: Global Citizenship: At Home and in the World
Micah-Sage Bolden 
SALZBURG – May 15-18, 2012 My experience with the Salzburg Global Seminar from over the last three days has broadened my emotional range, my international confidence, and my mastery of collaborative action; just as the seminar challenged me intellectually so did it emotionally and socially. One of the most touching experiences I have had was our trip to the Dachau Memorial. I had been reading about the Holocaust since I was young, but nothing could have prepared me for the heartbreaking weight of visiting a site that was host to the worst of what people of capable of, ‘singing with the voices of thousands of lost souls’. Each exhibit combined historical perspectives with an aura of sentiment unmatched by other memorials I have visited. Our excursion sparked passionate discussion upon our return that not only touched me intellectually, but also spiritually. The day following our Dachau tour we explored the histories and culture of pre- and post- Cold War Europe with Astrid Schröder, continued our intellectually enriching group work, and experienced a joint lecture with University of Salzburg students taught by Reinhold Wagnleitner, held at the university. My discussions with the Salzburg students helped to explore the intricacies of the problems facing America and addressed European views of the social, political, and economic struggles of the United States. Finally, Thursday’s presentation by Darci Arnold raised pertinent questions regarding the issues of corporate responsibility, the rising importance of data and integration between data, technology, and our lives, as well as the societal and cultural changes brought on by the advent of digital media and the digital economy. Our group work helped to solidify our views of global citizenship and its importance in our globalized society and aided in the development of lifelong partnerships in the pursuit of social justice and the maintenance of a global citizenship. My experiences with the seminar have expanded my mental and spiritual capacities and enhanced my understanding of international perceptions of the United States. Micah-Sage Bolden is a junior at King College in Bristol, TN, USA. He is majoring in history, political science and philosophy, concentrating on intelligence and security studies. He is the communications officer of the King Security and Intelligence Studies Group (KSI) and a member of the King World Awareness and Activation Campaign. He has served as the executive editor of King College’s Security and Intelligence Studies Journal; editor-in-chief of the Kayseean, a bi-weekly student publication; a member of the Board of Directors of the Appalachian Peace Education Center; and co-author of “Social Networking as a Paradigm Shift in Tactical Intelligence Collection” in the 2012 Mediterranean Council for Intelligence Studies. In the future, Micah-Sage would like work in diplomacy and social activism.
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ISP 52 - Issue 1: Global Citizenship: At Home and in the World
ISP 52 - Issue 1: Global Citizenship: At Home and in the World
Micah-Sage Bolden 
SALZBURG – May 12, 2012 My first three days of the Salzburg Global Seminar have in many ways been everything I expected, and yet beyond anything I could ever have imagined. Growing up in a valley of the Appalachian Mountains in Eastern Tennessee, it had always been a far off dream to see firsthand the idyllic landscape of Europe. My day of arrival in Salzburg was a day of firsts: my first time to leave the Southeastern United States, my first time ever riding in a plane, my first time in Europe, and yet the kindness with which I was greeted by the faculty, staff, and fellow attendees of the seminar resonated with a charm that echoed the Southern hospitality of my homeland. The topic of the seminar – global citizenship – at first seemed as foreign as the Schloss or the mighty fortress on the hill, but just as the Schloss quickly became a second home, so too did the concept of global citizenship rapidly settle into the deepest confines of my mind and heart. The plenary discussions of the seminar helped to make concrete the airy concepts of ethnocentrism and globalization, challenging me with firsthand encounters of global citizenship; sitting in the plenary discussions, surrounded by amazing minds from all over the world and the beautiful landscape of the Austrian countryside, it quickly became clear what global citizenship meant and how this should play out in our everyday lives. From the concise and informative sessions of Mapping Ethnocentrism and Mapping Globalization, to the insightful lecture regarding the dramatic migratory patterns of humanity, to the amazingly inspirational (and eye-opening) lecture by Najwa Gadaheldam on women in Islam and Africa, each session helped to solidify the concept of global citizenship while prompting edifying question and answer sessions. My favorite moments of the seminar by far, though, have been the profound conversations I have shared with my fellow students and the faculty. Not only have I discovered kindred spirits that have further inspired and developed my ideals and future plans, but I have also been exposed for the first time to challenges that rarely transverse into my daily consciousness. My conversations with the students of Bennett College have, in particular, helped to develop my understanding of the problems of race and gender in our country as well as my understanding of the challenge of white privilege to equality and justice in the U.S. and the world as a whole; I have never before in my life had such weighty conversations that both influence my way of thinking and help me to understand the steps needed to confront these problems. The first three days of the Seminar have already proven to be some of the most important of my life in regards to my intellectual and spiritual growth and have helped me to understand the need for cooperation in the confrontation of violence, hate, and injustice in our globalized society. As Mrs. Gadaheldam said, “Don’t think you can walk alone in this world and make a difference,” and it is with this powerful sentiment that I move forward to embrace the rest of the seminar. Micah-Sage Bolden is a junior at King College in Bristol, TN, USA. He is majoring in history, political science and philosophy, concentrating on intelligence and security studies. He is the communications officer of the King Security and Intelligence Studies Group (KSI) and a member of the King World Awareness and Activation Campaign. He has served as the executive editor of King College’s Security and Intelligence Studies Journal; editor-in-chief of the Kayseean, a bi-weekly student publication; a member of the Board of Directors of the Appalachian Peace Education Center; and co-author of “Social Networking as a Paradigm Shift in Tactical Intelligence Collection” in the 2012 Mediterranean Council for Intelligence Studies. In the future, Micah-Sage would like work in diplomacy and social activism.
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Houston Community College students blog on their time at ISP 53
Houston Community College students blog on their time at ISP 53
Houston Community College 
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NEW WEBSITE

For latest information, consult the new Global Citizenship Alliance website at www.GlobalCitizenshipAlliance.org.